Tableau – Photo Scene

tableau

Description

Have the students compose and shoot a photo depicting an idea or conveying a learning objective.

Materials

  • Camera
  • Smart phone with camera
  • Projector and cables to link to camera or laptop with photos.

Considerations

  • If students are bringing their own devices to school, this is a great opportunity to have them leverage the technology. But consider forming the groups so that students without smart phones are paired with ones that do.
  • Students can photograph each other or objects.
  • Allow students to move about their learning environment to be as creative as possible.
  • Grouping: Students can work in pairs or small groups of 3-4.

Examples

Law 12 class example – thanks to Dave Searcy for sharing this example

Perspectives:

There are different perspectives regarding the Youth Criminal Justice and as we have discussed the key question for our unit is:
Is the Youth Criminal Justice Act too lenient?

Thus, we need to take this one on!

Getting into it…

In a small group of 3 to 5 develop two images (or charades or a tableau) – one that would lead the viewer to feel that the Youth Criminal Justice Act is too lenient and the other that would lead to the conclusion it is not (or is even too harsh).

Showing me what you think…

Once we have viewed the images and presentations – we will have some time for a free write in which you can give your perspectives on the question.  You can write in a formal style if you wish – however you can choose another form if you wish. 

Assessment

A sample assessment used for the Law 12 example which was borrowed from an English 11 Essay Writing Rubric:

A response may or may not conform to each and every descriptor within a particular scale point.

Mark: 6

  • • A relevant position/thesis, as directed by the command term, is clearly stated.
  • • Superior recall of factual content; organized in a thoughtful and effective manner.
  • • Position is supported with thoroughly developed details and insightful conclusions are drawn.
  • • Expression is clear and fluent with few flaws in communication.

Mark : 5

  • • A relevant position/thesis, as directed by the command term, is clearly stated.
  • • Proficient recall of factual content; organized in a thoughtful and effective manner.
  • • Position is supported with well-developed details and effective conclusions are drawn.
  • • Expression is generally fluent with few flaws in communication.

Mark: 4

  • • A relevant position/thesis, as directed by the command term, is adequate.
  • • Competent recall of factual content; generally organized in a clear manner.
  • • Position is supported with sufficient details and adequate conclusions are drawn.
  • • Expression is sufficiently fluent; errors do not impede meaning.

Mark: 3

  • • A relevant position/thesis, as directed by the command term, is adequate.
  • • Minimal recall of factual content; organization is attempted.
  • • Position is supported with some detail and conclusions are weak.
  • • Expression is limited; errors may distract and impede meaning.

Mark: 2

  • • A position/thesis is insufficient.
  • • Limited recall of factual content; lacks organization.
  • • Absence of supporting details, little or no relevant conclusion.
  • • Expression is awkward; errors interfere with meaning.

Mark : 1

  • • A position/thesis is absent.
  • • Deficient recall of factual content; lacks organization.
  • • Absence of supporting detail.
  • • Expression is full of errors making understanding difficult.

Comments are closed.